Leadership Powers Published in the Crisis Response Journal

I had the distinct honor of having my article "Leadership Powers" published in the most recent edition of the Crisis Response Journal (CRJ). See the article below. The CRJ is an excellent way to stay current on emergency management issues worldwide. You can subscribe to the CRJ by going to www.crisis-response.com. Use my personal code to get yourself a 20% discount (RANDAL20). #Leadership #EmergencyManagement #LeadersIntent #LeadershipDevelopment #CRJ #CrisisResponseJournal #

ShoutOut LA

I was honored to be recognized by ShoutOutLA this morning! Click this link to find out what it said: https://shoutoutla.com/meet-dr-randal-collins-cem-leader-emergency-manager-change-agent/ #SHOUTOUTLA #Leadership #LeadersIntent #LeadershipDevelopment

The Building Blocks of Leadership

Few people contemplate the power of an organization that is built on leadership. We often see leadership displayed by a handful of people within an organization. We rarely see organizations built on leadership. Building your organization on the backs of leaders is what I call the building blocks of leadership. Truly effective organizations have leaders at every echelon of the organization. Just like in the game Jenga, the most stable the tower of blocks will be is at the begi

Get An Ego Buster

Every leader needs an ego buster. Some people may need an ego buster before they can even break into the role of a leader, lest they be labeled a toxic leader. Others may not necessarily need one before coming a leader, but I guarantee you in the course of their leadership journey, they will use the ego buster time and time again to keep them far away from that toxic leader line. What is an ego buster and where do I get one you ask? Well, sometimes they are easy to find and s

Remain Clam! (sic)

At the beginning of my career, I was reviewing a dam emergency action plan in which the author identified that the first step during an incident was to remain clam (sic). Obviously, the author intended for the first step in the incident response to be “remain calm.” However, my colleague and I both found great humor in the fact that the author made the typo and that it specifically called for the plan implementer to remain calm, as if had it not people would immediately panic